Ecotourism on Mount Fuji
富士山生態旅遊
富士山生态旅游
富士山のエコツーリズム

Spring 2015

 
 
 
 
Towards the end of our journey in Japan, we could not resist the opportunity to climb the very emblem of Japan – Mount Fuji. Rising to 3,776 meters, the symbolic snow-capped mountain not only marks highest point of the nation, it has also been named a World Heritage by the UNESCO in 2013.

The increasing number of visitors to the natural and cultural symbol in Japan has raised the topic of ecotourism. At the exit of the mountain trail, tourists are asked for a voluntary 1,000-yen fee to help the area’s natural beauty. Garbage collection points and paid lavatories are also settled along the trail.

Amidst the challenging temperature differences, altitude sickness and lack of sleep, we were lucky enough to witness the “御来光” (Go-raikou /The Sunrise) at the Mount Fuji’s 8.5th station at 4 a.m., and then successfully reached the summit. Without paved roads that would destroy the mountain’s natural habitat, going downhill was nowhere easier than the way up. What kept us going was the chanting of “Fujisan!” at each stop and lending each other a helping hand.

Having climbed to the top of Mount Fuji and back, it is safe to say that one major achievement has been checked in our bucket lists!

By Janice Kwan, Cohort 4 (Class of 2016)

# Exchange in Tokyo – Cohort 4
detail01.jpg
Towards the end of our journey in Japan, we could not resist the opportunity to climb the very emblem of Japan – Mount Fuji. Rising to 3,776 meters, the symbolic snow-capped mountain not only marks highest point of the nation, it has also been named a World Heritage by the UNESCO in 2013.

The increasing number of visitors to the natural and cultural symbol in Japan has raised the topic of ecotourism. At the exit of the mountain trail, tourists are asked for a voluntary 1,000-yen fee to help the area’s natural beauty. Garbage collection points and paid lavatories are also settled along the trail.

Amidst the challenging temperature differences, altitude sickness and lack of sleep, we were lucky enough to witness the “御来光” (Go-raikou /The Sunrise) at the Mount Fuji’s 8.5th station at 4 a.m., and then successfully reached the summit. Without paved roads that would destroy the mountain’s natural habitat, going downhill was nowhere easier than the way up. What kept us going was the chanting of “Fujisan!” at each stop and lending each other a helping hand.

Having climbed to the top of Mount Fuji and back, it is safe to say that one major achievement has been checked in our bucket lists!

By Janice Kwan, Cohort 4 (Class of 2016)

# Exchange in Tokyo – Cohort 4
detail01.jpg
Towards the end of our journey in Japan, we could not resist the opportunity to climb the very emblem of Japan – Mount Fuji. Rising to 3,776 meters, the symbolic snow-capped mountain not only marks highest point of the nation, it has also been named a World Heritage by the UNESCO in 2013.

The increasing number of visitors to the natural and cultural symbol in Japan has raised the topic of ecotourism. At the exit of the mountain trail, tourists are asked for a voluntary 1,000-yen fee to help the area’s natural beauty. Garbage collection points and paid lavatories are also settled along the trail.

Amidst the challenging temperature differences, altitude sickness and lack of sleep, we were lucky enough to witness the “御来光” (Go-raikou /The Sunrise) at the Mount Fuji’s 8.5th station at 4 a.m., and then successfully reached the summit. Without paved roads that would destroy the mountain’s natural habitat, going downhill was nowhere easier than the way up. What kept us going was the chanting of “Fujisan!” at each stop and lending each other a helping hand.

Having climbed to the top of Mount Fuji and back, it is safe to say that one major achievement has been checked in our bucket lists!

By Janice Kwan, Cohort 4 (Class of 2016)

# Exchange in Tokyo – Cohort 4
detail01.jpg
Towards the end of our journey in Japan, we could not resist the opportunity to climb the very emblem of Japan – Mount Fuji. Rising to 3,776 meters, the symbolic snow-capped mountain not only marks highest point of the nation, it has also been named a World Heritage by the UNESCO in 2013.

The increasing number of visitors to the natural and cultural symbol in Japan has raised the topic of ecotourism. At the exit of the mountain trail, tourists are asked for a voluntary 1,000-yen fee to help the area’s natural beauty. Garbage collection points and paid lavatories are also settled along the trail.

Amidst the challenging temperature differences, altitude sickness and lack of sleep, we were lucky enough to witness the “御来光” (Go-raikou /The Sunrise) at the Mount Fuji’s 8.5th station at 4 a.m., and then successfully reached the summit. Without paved roads that would destroy the mountain’s natural habitat, going downhill was nowhere easier than the way up. What kept us going was the chanting of “Fujisan!” at each stop and lending each other a helping hand.

Having climbed to the top of Mount Fuji and back, it is safe to say that one major achievement has been checked in our bucket lists!

By Janice Kwan, Cohort 4 (Class of 2016)

# Exchange in Tokyo – Cohort 4
detail01.jpg